Auto FraudCar Problems You Wish Someone Told You About

January 19, 2018

car problems

As you get excited about purchasing a new vehicle, here are some car problems to look out for before buying a car

Did you know that in 2016, there were over 17 million cars and trucks purchased in the United States alone, as reported by CNN Money.  There were obviously more car purchases throughout the world, but the sheer volume of purchases in America is staggering.  Between the combination of improved economic conditions, used car sales, and easy credit, more and more people are buying cars than ever before.

For this reason it is imperative to be more educated on what to look out for when buying a car, especially if you’re looking at used cars, or what might appear to be brand new cars.

From the outset, here are some obvious things to consider:

Make sure the dealership discloses prior accidents

  • Sometimes, inventory moves very fast into the dealership that there might have been an overstep of not making note of the accident, so make sure you check for yourself as well
  • You are also able to find this information out independently on your own at https://www.carfax.com

Disclosure of frame damage

  • Frame damage can be a major issue but very easy to cover up, so make sure to look for and ask about detailed reports on frame damage

Prior engine defects and major repairs

  • These can be tedious to go through but if you really want the car or if its the only vehicle that fits your budget, then you need to ask and look for these items

Some of the most common car problems and major repairs to look out for:

 

  • Alternator problems
  • Fuel pump problems
  • Power steering problems
  • Carburetor problems
  • Ignition problems
  • Muffler problems
  • Exhaust problems

 

Troubleshooting Car Problems

In the event you decide to be intricately involved with your purchase transaction and the full experience of buying a car, you may want to consider learning about troubleshooting car problems.  This could be a hands on experience on your part at the dealership or as you’re inspecting it during your test drive, I’d recommend you be somewhat versed on how to test and tweak, or at the very least, know the lingo and where, how to look at things about the car.

AutoZone provides a very helpful set of steps and vocabulary for the general consumer to read up on and learn.  Here’s the link: https://goo.gl/s88y2U

What To Do When You Identify An Issue

One thing no one can take from you is your knowledge.  The fact that you have spent time reading, researching, and gathering data to educate yourself on buying a car is extremely significant.  Knowledge becomes power when you’re able to apply it.

In the event of finding car problems during your search, you will now have the leverage to command a solid negotiation for a better price, or you are better equipped to be more secure about your purchase (knowing that the car has no problems after you spent the time to do your initial inspection).

When you identify and issue do these things:

  • Point it out to the sales manager
  • Voice your opinion and be diligent about your findings
  • Request that they fix it
  • Or simply find another car OR dealer that fits your criteria 🙂

Just In Case…

If you already purchased a vehicle and were too excited to consider the potential car problems to avoid and can actually verify several or multiple disclosures from above, then certainly give us a call and we will be happy to connect you to an Auto Fraud Attorney to help you through the aftermath 🙂

Give us a call or fill out the form available.

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by John Lange

John is an enthusiastic writer for Consumer Center for Resources. He uses his skills as a writer to help those who are in need of legal protection. John likes to surf on the weekends, even if he falls many times.

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